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Star Phoenix sees wisdom in Bitney's Firewalk

The StarPhoenix reviewer Bill Robertson sees wisdom in Katherine Bitney's Firewalk: Bitney wants to strip life back to its spiritual basics, but she's wise enough to see we don't always know what we're looking for, so we can't always recognize it when it arrives." He notes that in Firewalk, "Bitney celebrates the crone, the poet, the shaman, the raw edges, fang and claw of the natural world, stripped of dogmas to its heartbeat." The full…
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Canadian Ethnic Studies "highly recommends" Baldur's Song to "readers who think history is dull"

Gudrun Björk Gudsteins, an English Professor from the University of Iceland, reviews David Arnason's Baldur's Song in U of M's Canadian Ethnic Studies Journal, Volume 43-44. Gudsteins appreciates Arnason's fantastical take on historical events, writing that, "above all this [novel] is the saga of the rebirth or revival of the “family” of Icelanders in their new homeland" and that "Baldur’s Song is an ode to the joys and opportunities and bountiful rewards of the new…
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Prairie Fire Review of Books praises Kristian Enright's poetry debut

Poet Steve Locke reviews Kristian Enright’s award-winning collection of poetry, Sonar, in Prairie Fire Review of Books' most recent issue. Locke applauds Enright for side-stepping the archetypes and clichés that his subject matter invites and writes that, rather, "Enright successfully steers right into the heart of his central speaker by pitting the characteristics of his abstract mind against itself." Locke writes that, by challenging "the conceptualization of madness and creativity," Enright has created a narrative,…
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Rhubarb on Dora Dueck's What You Get at Home: "Everything about it is engaging"

Rhubarb Magazine praises Dora Dueck's What You Get at Home in their Spring Issue, writing that "everything about it is engaging." Reviewer MaryLou Driedger notes that at the heart of these short stories are "women discovering their voices" and that "the ultimate pleasure of reading What You Get at Home is the author’s creative prose, which often sounds more like poetry. Readers will find themselves going back to certain passages many times to savour them."
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MB Herald Calls What You Get at Home "Profoundly Moving"

The Mennonite Brethern Herald has published a glowing review of Dora Dueck's short fiction collection, What You Get at Home. Tracing the presence and importance of everyday objects in Dueck's collection, and the ways in which these objects are representational for the people and relationships that surround them, Angeline Schellenberg writes that these stories are neverthleless, "not just about lives, but the power of the written word." Schellenberg praises Dueck's "powerful" stories for "getting at…
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Sun Times says there is "no better book" for hockey fans than On the Fly

Wayne Tefs' fan memoir On the Fly was featured in a Christmas edition of The Owen Sound Sun Times as one of two books to "help those missing their NHL fix." Andrew Armitage writes that, "for hockey fans, there could be no better book, one that is told with the passion and ecstasy of a true fan with a deep understanding of the game." Tefs' descriptions of solidarity through fandom resonate with Armitage, who sees…
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Prairie Fire Review of Books calls What You Get at Home "very satisfying"

"What You Get at Home is a collection of 15 very satisfying short stories by Winnipeg author Dora Dueck. ...Perhaps the most poignant of the stories is 'My Name Is Magdalena.' A woman attends a writing class but writing a story brings back so many tragic memories – of moving from Ukraine to east of the Urals, then back again, and then, during World War II, having to flee with three young sons before the…
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Prairie Fire Review of Books calls Dating "an enjoyable romp through later middle age"

"This novel is an enjoyable romp through later middle age – it’s about time this stage of life was explored – and the pursuit of romantic happiness. ...As Williamson describes in immaculate detail, finding love in late middle age is a dangerous pursuit. All the individuals, including Jenkins, are damaged goods carrying the baggage of a lifetime. Given this, one could expect Dating to be a depressing novel – but it’s not. Somehow, hope persists.…
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Turnstone Press

206-100 Arthur Street
Winnipeg, MB   R3B 1H3
CANADA
 
Ph: 204-947-1555; Toll Free: 888-363-7718
 

Turnstone Press acknowledges the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, the Manitoba Arts Council, the Government of Canada through the Canada Book Fund, and the Province of Manitoba through Manitoba Culture Heritage, Tourism and Sport.

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